Supreme Court Rules on GPS Tracking By Police

In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court has ruled that police need a warrant if they wish to use a GPS tracking device on a suspect’s vehicle.

National Public Radio’s Nina Totenberg explained to Paul Brown:

“At issue here is the case of Antoine Jones, a Washington, D.C. night club owner. Police put a GPS tracking device on his car for 30 days. That helped authorities find a stash of money and drugs.”

“The Supreme Court decided today that placing a GPS device on a vehicle constitutes a search, so they need a warrant. The AP reports that Justice Antonin Scalia wrote the court’s main opinion.”

 
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Should you refuse a request from a police officer to search your car?  How should you refuse a search request?  When do you have to show ID?  Is a police officer allowed to lie to you? 

For answers to these and other questions  in the form of short video reenactments and basic FAQs, visit http://flexyourrights.org/, a non-profit whose mission it is to educate the public on how the basic Bill of Rights protections apply during encounters with law enforcement.